CNBD News

Jeff Wozniak
May 11, 2015

Wozniak is optimistic on the basis of early results that choline can be a viable option to help young children diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome and is moving ahead in this area.

“This would not be a therapy that can directly fix what alcohol exposure damaged,” he said. “However, adding choline at this critical preschool age helps the hippocampus develop as optimally as possible, which could reduce a lifetime of learning and memory difficulties.”

Dante Cicchetti
April 29, 2015

Cicchetti, along with three other University of Minnesota professors, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the nation’s most prestigious honorary societies. Cicchetti is one of the world’s leading researchers in developmental and clinical psychology and has long studied the effects of child maltreatment. Click here for the CE+HD news link.

Bouncing Back
April 16, 2015

The Department of Pediatrics, through the Center for Neurobehavioral Development, is pleased to announce a funding opportunity for innovative Neurodevelopment & Child Mental Health Development research at the University of Minnesota through the Masonic Children’s Hospital Research Fund.

Frank Symons
April 1, 2015

The Distinguished McKnight University Professorship program recognizes outstanding faculty members who have recently achieved full professor status. Frank Symons has been recognized as a McKnight Professor for his ground-breaking work in transforming the field of special education - challenging conventional wisdom about pain, sensory processing, and self-injury. Recipients hold the title “Distinguished McKnight University Professor” for as long as they remain employed at the University of Minnesota.

 

Bernadette Gillick
March 31, 2015

Neuroscientist Bernadette Gillick works with young people who suffered a stroke in utero. The unaffected side of the brain has taken up the slack and is doing work the stroke side would normally do. Dr. Gillick thinks transcranial direct-current stimulation could help rebalance the brain, so both hemispheres can contribute to movement.

Megan Gunnar
March 3, 2015

Scientists are trying to connect the dots — to get a clearer picture of what exactly adverse childhood experiences do to the body and why the study results came out the way they did.

"Well, you've reshaped the biology of the child," says Megan Gunnar, a developmental psychologist at the University of Minnesota who, for more than 30 years, has been studying the ways children respond to stressful experiences. "This is how nature protects us," Gunnar adds. We all become adapted to living in "the kinds of environments we're born into."

ASD
January 30, 2015

The Fifth Annual Aspen Brain Forum, Shaping the Developing Brain: Prenatal through Early Childhood, focused on developmental brain research and what it can tell us about designing interventions to improve outcomes for at-risk children. It looked at typical and atypical development of human learning, memory, emotion, and social behavior, as well as socioeconomic, family, and nutritional factors that can affect brain and behavior.

His presentation, An Overview on Nutritional Status and Brain Development: The Importance of Timing in Determining the Right Intervention and Brain Assessment, can be viewed on the Brain Forum website.

Megan Gunnar
January 23, 2015

Megan Gunnar, director and Regents Professor at the Institute of Child Development and CNBD associate director,  gave the keynote address at Minnesota Public Radio’s (MPR) “Healthy States” initiative discussion with community leaders on the science of toxic stress in babies and children on January 20. The discussion was broadcast on MPR. 

Megan Gunnar, director and Regents Professor at the Institute of Child Development,  gave the keynote address at Minnesota Public Radio’s (MPR) “Healthy States” initiative discussion with community leaders on the science of toxic stress in babies and children on January 20. The discussion was broadcast on MPR. - See more at: http://news.cehd.umn.edu/megan-gunnar-leads-discussion-on-healthy-child-...

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